Press Releases

Press release February 16, 2009

http://www.prlog.org/10183429-social-networks-spread-happiness-and-provide-negative-stress-relief-study-shows.html

Social Networks Spread Happyness and Provide Negative Stress Relieve, Study Shows

Harvard researchers found that happiness can spread through social networks. atQuid is one of the newest social networks online and allows enthusiasts of antiques, art and vintage objects to share their passion, invite friends and broadcast their knowledge.

New research from Harvard Medical School and the University of California, San Diego, published in December in BMJ (BMJ 2008;337:a233) suggests that happiness can spread from person to person within a social network and extends up to three degrees of separation (friends of a friend’s friend). People can "catch" positive emotional states they observe in others over time frames ranging from seconds to weeks. Examination of social networks indicates that happy people tend to be connected to one another.

One of the newest social networks online is atQuid, a community for antiques, art and vintage object enthusiasts and collectors. By its very nature, collecting is an extraverted, positive social experience. Collectors love to share their passion and explain the stories behind their favorite collectors’ items.

atQuid offers interactive features such as those on Youtube and networking tools such as those found on LinkedIn, Plaxo and Facebook. It allows members to build meaningful social exchange and network, sharing their passion with fellow members. The content is user generated and membership is free.

Alan Ehrlich, “serial collector” and founder of atQuid: “Collecting is all about sharing a passion. Even if you don’t collect the same thing as a friend or acquaintance you try to understand what they are collecting, you live their passion through their eyes. “

atQuid is one of the very few antique and collectors Websites that combines the informational side of the many different antique, art and vintage items and collectibles with networking and social exchange.

About atQuid

Quid = What?/How much? (Latin)

Qunol = QUid Network Online Legacy

atQuid was founded by Alan Ehrlich, a US citizen, born and raised in New York and living in Geneva Switzerland since nearly 40 years. Throughout his life, Alan has been collecting many different objects, including phonographs, music boxes, vintage toys period furniture, 20th century design, Coca Cola and other advertising items, posters, postcards, watches, pens, and much more. After studies in New York and Philadelphia completing a BA and MA in Psychology, he left for Switzerland, where he pursued his graduate studies with Prof. Jean Piaget, the famous child psychologist. He then went on to work at Battelle Institute, a global think tank, to Nestlé, where he provided counsel to top management, and finally launched his own market research institute. Over the years one of his hobbies, vintage wristwatches, became his business, when he founded “Time & Design” an international company trading in these vintage timekeepers. Later he also organized major international auctions of vintage fountain pens, including one that earned him a Guinness Book of Records inscription for the “Most Expensive Vintage Fountain Pen in the World”. Alan lives with his wife and 2 children in a country house close to Geneva and runs atQuid out of his home.

atQuid

Sharing the Passion. Preserving the Knowledge

Press release February 9, 2009

When online networking hits a wall… Share your passions with others

“Connection collectors” on general networking sites hinder networking. Increasingly real networkers join groups or communities to reach out in a more meaningful way. A recent addition in this arena: @quid.com, a free online community for antiques, vintage & art object enthusiasts, where networking is the key focus.

More and more often on Forums or in Groups the question pops up: “How do I refuse to connect with somebody I don’t know?” “What is the netiquette to uninviting people?”

Networkers on general networking sites like Linkedin or Plaxo are coming to a realization: It’s not sufficient to collect contacts; there needs to be a more human connection. One of the triggering factors is the accelerating phenomenon of “connection collectors“, individuals who try to beat records in how many people they have in their network.

This phenomenon has a very tangible downside: Since “connection collectors” don’t know the people they connect with, their connections are not a great help for networking either. It’s like having a phonebook with names. Ultimately this is a dead-end.

Real networkers are looking for additional opportunities to really connect. By joining groups or community websites they build on common interests that allow them to reach out in a more meaningful way.

Inherently, art objects, antiques, vintage items and collectibles represent an ideal platform to share a passion, with networking as a beneficial side-effect. This kind of collecting – as opposed to collecting connections - is a social experience, a lifestyle and by its nature extraverted. Collectors like to share, meet, and talk about their collections and finds. Networking happens naturally.

One of the most recent additions in this arena is @Quid (www.atquid.com), an online community for antiques, vintage & art object enthusiasts. Membership is free and the site offers fully interactive features such as the ones found on Youtube, as well as networking tools such as those found on LinkedIn, Plaxo and Facebook. The content is user generated and not limited to one collection area.

Whilst at first glance the content may resemble some of the existing websites, the approach is totally different. Most existing antiques and art object websites focus primarily on the object; social interaction is a by-product, if it exists at all.

@Quid’s focus is first and foremost on the social interaction and the lifestyle. @Quid allows collectors and enthusiasts – via multi media – to interact and connect. Members are encouraged to share their particular passion with others, and to preserve and communicate their knowledge. Alan Ehrlich, “serial collector” and founder of @Quid: “Collecting is all about sharing a passion. Even if you don’t collect the same thing as a friend or acquaintance you try to understand what they are collecting, you live their passion through their eyes.“

Another key objective of @Quid is to centralize, organize and preserve the legacy of knowledge dispersed/fragmented between individual collectors, curators and other experts throughout the World. For this purpose it has created Qunol, a knowledge database whose goals are comparable to Wikipedia’s, but focused on art objects, antiques, vintage items and collectibles. Alan Ehrlich: ‘Over the years I met many collectors and art object enthusiasts at shows, during auctions and in exhibitions. I was struck by the incredible knowledge these people, individually, had accumulated over the years. With Qunol we have created a tool that allows members to broadcast their knowledge and to preserve this expertise for future generations.’

Whilst @Quid is still in its infancy and relies on collectors and enthusiasts to make this their home, it has the ambition to become the place on the Internet where collectors and enthusiasts share their passion, connect and network as well as find, free, complete knowledge about antiques, objects of art, collectibles and vintage items. Alan Ehrlich: ‘YouTube, LinkedIn, Facebook, Wikipedia all started small… it doesn’t often happen that you can be a real pioneer!”

www.atquid.com

About @Quid

Quid = What?/How much? (Latin)

Qunol = QUid Network Online Legacy

@Quid was founded by Alan Ehrlich, a US citizen, born and raised in New York and living in Geneva Switzerland since nearly 40 years. Throughout his life, Alan has been collecting many different objects, including phonographs, music boxes, vintage toys period furniture, 20th century design, Coca Cola and other advertising items, posters, postcards, watches, pens, and much more. After studies in New York and Philadelphia completing a BA and MA in Psychology, he left for Switzerland, where he pursued his graduate studies with Prof. Jean Piaget, the famous child psychologist. He then went on to work at Battelle Institute, a global think tank, to Nestlé, where he provided counsel to top management, and finally launched his own market research institute. Over the years one of his hobbies, vintage wristwatches, became his business, when he founded “Time & Design” an international company trading in these vintage timekeepers. Later he also organized major international auctions of vintage fountain pens, including one that earned him a Guiness Book of Records inscription for the “Most Expensive Vintage Fountain Pen in the World”. Alan lives with his wife and 2 children in a country house close to Geneva and runs @Quid out of his home.

@Quid

Sharing the Passion, Preserving the Knowledge.

Contact:

Gabriela Ehrlich

Press Office @Quid

+41 22 752 29 92

+41 79 600 56 72 (cell)

Gabriela@atquid.com